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Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2016 May;23(3):141-5. doi: 10.1053/j.ackd.2016.01.015.

Critical Care Ultrasound: A Review for Practicing Nephrologists.

Author information

1
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; and Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: Jenny.wilson@ucsf.edu.
2
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; and Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

Abstract

The use of point-of-care ultrasound in the intensive care unit, both for diagnostic and procedural purposes, has rapidly proliferated, and evidence supporting its use is growing. Conceptually, critical care ultrasound (CCUS) should be considered an extension of the physical examination and should not be considered a replacement for formal echocardiography or radiology-performed ultrasound. Several CCUS applications are of particular relevance to nephrologists, including focused renal ultrasound in patients at high risk for urinary tract obstruction, real-time ultrasound guidance and verification during the placement of central venous catheters, and ultrasound-augmented assessment of shock and volume status. Each of these applications has the capacity to improve outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury. Although robust evidence regarding long-term outcomes is lacking, existing data demonstrate that CCUS has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy, expedite appropriate management, and increase safety for critically ill patients across a spectrum of pathologies.

KEYWORDS:

Central venous catheter; Critical care; Shock; Ultrasound

PMID:
27113689
DOI:
10.1053/j.ackd.2016.01.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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