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Am J Prev Med. 2016 Oct;51(4):437-45. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.023. Epub 2016 Apr 21.

Trends in the Prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease in the U.S.: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2012.

Author information

1
Healthcare Delivery and Methodologies IRG, Division of AIDS, Behavioral, and Population Sciences, Center for Scientific Review, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: sarah.yoon@nih.gov.
2
(Retired) National Center for Health Statistics, CDC, Hyattsville, Maryland.
3
Office of New Drugs Immediate Office, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland.
4
Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC, Hyattsville, Maryland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study evaluated recent trends in the prevalence of coronary heart disease in the U.S. population aged ≥40 years.

METHODS:

A total of 21,472 adults aged ≥40 years from the 2001-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in the analysis. The analysis was conducted in 2015. Coronary heart disease included myocardial infarction, angina, and any other type of coronary heart disease, which were defined as a history of medical diagnosis of these specific conditions. Angina was also defined as currently taking anti-angina medication or having Rose Angina Questionnaire responses that scored with a Grade ≥1. Trends from 2001 to 2012 were analyzed overall, within demographic subgroups, and by major coronary heart disease risk factors.

RESULTS:

Between 2001 and 2012, the overall prevalence of coronary heart disease significantly decreased from 10.3% to 8.0% (p-trend<0.05). The prevalence of angina significantly decreased from 7.8% to 5.5% and myocardial infarction prevalence decreased from 5.5% to 4.7% (p-trend <0.05 for both groups). Overall coronary heart disease prevalence significantly decreased among women, adults aged >60 years, non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, adults who did not complete high school, adults with more than a high school education, and adults who had health insurance (p-trend <0.05 for all groups).

CONCLUSIONS:

The overall prevalence of coronary heart disease including angina and myocardial infarction decreased significantly over the 12-year survey period. However, this reduction was seen mainly among persons without established coronary heart disease risk factors. There was no change in coronary heart disease prevalence among those with specific coronary heart disease risk factors.

PMID:
27113539
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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