Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transplant Proc. 2016 Mar;48(2):643-5. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2016.03.020.

Successful Pregnancies in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Experience of the National Kidney Transplant Program From Uruguay.

Author information

1
Nephrology and Urology Institute, Montevideo, Uruguay.
2
Nephrology and Urology Institute, Montevideo, Uruguay; Department of Nephrology, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay. Electronic address: mninvaez@gmail.com.
3
Department of Nephrology, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.
4
Nephrology and Urology Institute, Montevideo, Uruguay; Department of Nephrology, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Renal transplantation increases the possibilities of pregnancy in women of reproductive age. The course of pregnancy was analyzed retrospectively in patients with kidney or kidney-pancreas transplant, surveying maternal-fetal or renal graft complications and the relation with pre-pregnancy renal function.

METHODS:

A cohort that includes all the kidney transplant recipients who went through pregnancy in Uruguay in a period of 28 years is described. Forty pregnancies in 32 patients were registered; the average time between the kidney transplant and the beginning of the gestation period was 47 months. From the total gestations, 10 abortions, 1 neonatal death, and 1 fetal demise were registered. From the remaining pregnancies, we highlight prematurity (18/29) and low birth weight (14/21). Twenty-nine in 30 pregnancies ended in cesarean section; in 8 of 30, pre-eclampsia diagnosis was performed. Acute rejection was diagnosed in 2 of 30 pregnancies, both undergoing their first post-transplant year.

RESULTS:

Two patients required dialysis throughout the pregnancy because of progress into severe renal insufficiency. Higher obstetric perinatal morbidity and renal function deterioration was related to lower pre-pregnancy glomerular filtration rate (GFR).

CONCLUSIONS:

A successful pregnancy is possible in transplant recipients, yet there are risks of prematurity, low birth weight, and abortion. A lower GFR before pregnancy was associated with poorer maternal and perinatal results as shown in the different series.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center