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J Occup Health. 2016 Jun 16;58(3):255-68. doi: 10.1539/joh.15-0044-OA. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Individual and group-level job resources and their relationships with individual work engagement.

Author information

1
Center for Organizational and Occupational Sciences.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study adds a multilevel perspective to the well-researched individual-level relationship between job resources and work engagement. In addition, we explored whether individual job resources cluster within work groups because of a shared psychosocial environment and investigated whether a resource-rich psychosocial work group environment is beneficial for employee engagement over and above the beneficial effect of individual job resources and independent of their variability within groups.

METHODS:

Data of 1,219 employees nested in 103 work groups were obtained from a baseline employee survey of a large stress management intervention project implemented in six medium and large-sized organizations in diverse sectors. A variety of important job resources were assessed and grouped to an overall job resource factor with three subfactors (manager behavior, peer behavior, and task-related resources). Data were analyzed using multilevel random coefficient modeling.

RESULTS:

The results indicated that job resources cluster within work groups and can be aggregated to a group-level job resources construct. However, a resource-rich environment, indicated by high group-level job resources, did not additionally benefit employee work engagement but on the contrary, was negatively related to it.

CONCLUSIONS:

On the basis of this unexpected result, replication studies are encouraged and suggestions for future studies on possible underlying within-group processes are discussed. The study supports the presumed value of integrating work group as a relevant psychosocial environment into the motivational process and indicates a need to further investigate emergent processes involved in aggregation procedures across levels.

PMID:
27108639
PMCID:
PMC5356950
DOI:
10.1539/joh.15-0044-OA
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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