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Springerplus. 2016 Apr 11;5:429. doi: 10.1186/s40064-016-2076-x. eCollection 2016.

Investigating the clinical significance of body composition changes in patients undergoing chemoradiation for oropharyngeal cancer using analytic morphomics.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, UHB2C447, SPC 5010, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5010 USA.
2
Morphomic Analysis Group, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, UHB2C447, SPC 5010, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5010 USA ; Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health Care System, Ann Arbor, MI USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose is to investigate the clinical significance of body morphomics changes in stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer patients during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT).

METHODS:

Fifty patients who underwent CRT were selected for body composition analyses by either availability of pre/post treatment DEXA scans or a novel CT-based approach of body morphomics analysis (BMA). BMA changes (lean psoas and total psoas area) were compared to total lean body mass changes by DEXA scans using two-sample t tests. Pearson correlation was used to compare the BMA measures to head and neck specific quality of life outcomes. Cox hazards model was used to predict mortality and tumor recurrence.

RESULTS:

Clinically significant declines in total psoas area and lean body mass of similar magnitude were observed in both BMA and DEXA cohorts after CRT. Loss of psoas area (P < 0.05) was associated with greater frailty and mobility issues (3 out of 15 UWQOL domains). Total psoas area is more sensitive for local recurrence than weight changes and T-stage on multivariate analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

BMA specifically evaluating psoas area appears to correlate with head and neck cancer quality of life physical domains. Pre- and post-treatment total psoas area at L4 appears prognostic for tumor recurrence.

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