Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2016 Apr 22;352(6284):aaf1098. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf1098. Epub 2016 Apr 21.

Trained immunity: A program of innate immune memory in health and disease.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands. mihai.netea@radboudumc.nl.
2
Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
3
Institute of Innate Immunity, Bonn University, Bonn, Germany. Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655, USA. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
4
School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
5
Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
6
Department of Molecular Biology, Faculties of Science and Medicine, Radboud Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
7
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Center for Computational and Integrative Biology and Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

The general view that only adaptive immunity can build immunological memory has recently been challenged. In organisms lacking adaptive immunity, as well as in mammals, the innate immune system can mount resistance to reinfection, a phenomenon termed "trained immunity" or "innate immune memory." Trained immunity is orchestrated by epigenetic reprogramming, broadly defined as sustained changes in gene expression and cell physiology that do not involve permanent genetic changes such as mutations and recombination, which are essential for adaptive immunity. The discovery of trained immunity may open the door for novel vaccine approaches, new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of immune deficiency states, and modulation of exaggerated inflammation in autoinflammatory diseases.

PMID:
27102489
PMCID:
PMC5087274
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf1098
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center