Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Jun 15;107(1):71-76. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.04.016. Epub 2016 Apr 18.

Plastic ingestion by a generalist seabird on the coast of Uruguay.

Author information

1
Centro de Investigación y Conservación Marina - CICMAR, Avenida Giannattasio Km 30.5, Canelones 15008, Uruguay; Department of Forestry and Natural Resources & Ecological Sciences and Engineering Program, Purdue University, 715 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States. Electronic address: javier.lenzi@cicmar.org.
2
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República (UDELAR), Iguá 4225, Montevideo 11400, Uruguay.
3
Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University, Belfast, 18-30 Malone Road, BT9 5BN, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom; Department of Planetology and Habitability, Astrobiology Centre (CSIC-INTA), 28850, Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain.
4
Centro Universitario Regional Este, Universidad de la República, Maldonado, Uruguay.

Abstract

We analyzed plastic ingestion by Kelp Gull (Larus dominicanus) from 806 pellets collected between 2011 and 2013. Employing a Raman spectroscopy, we characterized those polymers used to produce the plastics ingested. Debris was recorded in 143 pellets (%FO=17.7%, n=202, 92.58g). Plastic was found in 119 pellets (%FO=83%) and non-plastic occurred in 56 pellets (%FO=39%). The most important debris category was plastic film with 55.3% (n=79). Plastic bags were observed in 19 pellets (%FO=2.4%, weight=25.02g). Glass was the second most important component (%FO=18.9%) followed by plastic fragments (%FO=17.8%). Plastic debris represented the 65.3% of the debris fragments (n=132, weight=58.84g), and was composed by polyethylene (52%), polypropylene (26%), polyamide (12%), polystyrene (6%), polyvinyl chloride (2%), and polyethylene terephthalate (2%). How plastics were obtained by gulls and the effects on individuals are discussed, as well as environmental considerations about plastic pollution on coastal environments.

KEYWORDS:

Plastic film; Plastic pollution; Seabirds; Synthetic polymers; Uruguay

PMID:
27098991
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.04.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center