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Dysphagia. 2016 Jun;31(3):339-51. doi: 10.1007/s00455-016-9710-1. Epub 2016 Apr 20.

Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville, 511 South Floyd St MDR 616, Louisville, KY, 40202, USA.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, USA.
3
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders, University of Louisville, Louisville, USA.
4
Department of Neurological Surgery, Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville, 511 South Floyd St MDR 616, Louisville, KY, 40202, USA. t.pitts@louisville.edu.

Abstract

Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Deglutition; Deglutition disorders; Fibrosis; Pharynx; Radiation; Swallow

PMID:
27098922
PMCID:
PMC5340192
DOI:
10.1007/s00455-016-9710-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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