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Neurochem Res. 2016 Aug;41(8):2086-96. doi: 10.1007/s11064-016-1921-1. Epub 2016 Apr 21.

Inhibition of the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway Restores Cultured Spinal Cord-Injured Neuronal Migration, Adhesion, and Dendritic Spine Development.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedics, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, 300052, China.
2
Department of Orthopedics, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, 300052, China. fengsq9@gmail.com.

Abstract

The Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway plays an important role in central and peripheral neurons in functions such as dendritic arborization, neuronal polarity, and axon assembly. However, emerging evidence also shows that up-regulation of this signaling pathway may lead to the development of spinal cord injury. The present study aimed to determine the effects of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on properties of spinal cord-injured neurons. First, neurons from spinal cord-injured C57BL/6 J mouse pups and sham-operated C57BL/6 J mouse pups were harvested. Then, immunofluorescence, western blotting, cell adhesion and cell migration assays, and DiI labeling were employed to investigate the effect of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on spinal cord-injured neurons. Immunofluorescence results of synapse formation indicated that the experimental spinal cord injury model was successfully established. Western blot results identified upregulated Erk phosphorylation in the spinal cord-injured neurons, and also showed that U0126 inhibited phosphorylation of Erk, which is a downstream kinase in the Ras/Raf signaling pathway. Additionally, cell migration and adhesion was significantly increased in the spinal cord-injured neurons. DiI labeling results also showed an increased formation of mature spines after inhibition of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling. Taken together, these results suggested that the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could serve as an effective treatment target for spinal cord injury.

KEYWORDS:

Axonal regeneration; Neuronal cell culture; Phosphorylation-ERK; Ras/Raf/ERk1/2; Spinal cord injury; U0126

PMID:
27097549
DOI:
10.1007/s11064-016-1921-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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