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Int Urol Nephrol. 2016 Aug;48(8):1243-1246. doi: 10.1007/s11255-016-1290-3. Epub 2016 Apr 19.

Analysis of vitamin D deficiency in calcium stone-forming patients.

Author information

1
Primary Care, Health Centre of Pinos Puente, Programa de Doctorado de Medicina Clínica y Salud Pública, Granada University, Granada, Spain.
2
Institute IBS Granada, Plaza Ciudad de los Cármenes, No. 4, Granada, Spain.
3
Institute IBS Granada, Plaza Ciudad de los Cármenes, No. 4, Granada, Spain. arrabalp@ono.com.
4
Biochemical Department, Santa Ana Hospital, Granada, Spain.
5
Endocrinology Department, Granada University Hospital, Granada, Spain.
6
Biochemical Department, Granada University Hospital, Granada, Spain.
7
Medicine Department, Granada University, Granada, Spain.
8
Surgery Department, Institute IBS Granada, Granada University, Granada, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study is to analyse the percentage of hypovitaminosis D, as well as its relationship with the various parameters of calcium-phosphate metabolism.

METHODS:

A case control study was conducted on 366 patients, divided into two groups: Group 1: 127 non-stone-forming patients, and Group 2: 239 calcium stone forming. A study was performed on calcium-phosphate metabolism and urinary lithogenic factors. The percentage of vitamin D deficiency (25-OH-vitamin D levels <20 ng/ml) between the groups was analysed and compared. The SPSS 20.0 statistics program was used for the analysis, with a p ≤ .05 being considered significant.

RESULTS:

The mean age of Group 1 was 52.1 years compared to 49.6 years in Group 2, with no significant differences (p = .07). Vitamin D levels were lower in Group 2 compared to Group 1 (25.7 vs. 28.4 ng/ml, p = .02). A vitamin D deficiency was observed in 28 % of the Group 2 stone-forming patients versus 15.7 % in Group 1 (p = .009), with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.09 (95 % CI; 1.19-3.63). In the stone-forming patients with a vitamin D deficiency, the only difference observed was the higher levels of iPTH compared to those stone-formers with a normal vitamin D (56.9 vs. 45.5 pg/ml, respectively; p = .0001).

CONCLUSION:

Calcium stone-forming patients have lower mean levels of vitamin D and a higher percentage of hypovitaminosis D than in non-stone-forming patients. This was only related to increased iPTH levels, with urine calcium and other lithogenic parameters having no obvious effect.

KEYWORDS:

Calcium; Calcium stones; Metabolism; Phosphorus; Vitamin D deficiency

PMID:
27093967
DOI:
10.1007/s11255-016-1290-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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