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J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2016 Jun;27(6):100. doi: 10.1007/s10856-016-5710-9. Epub 2016 Apr 18.

Plasma sprayed cerium oxide coating inhibits H2O2-induced oxidative stress and supports cell viability.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai, 200050, People's Republic of China.
2
Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai, 200050, People's Republic of China. xbzheng@mail.sic.ac.cn.

Abstract

Oxidative stress is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and plays a major role in bone regeneration of osteoporotic patients. Cerium oxide (CeO2) ceramics have the unique ability to protect various types of cells from oxidative damage, making them attractive for biomedical applications. In this study, we developed a plasma sprayed CeO2 coating with a hierarchical topography where ceria nanoparticles were superimposed in the micro-rough coating surface. The protective effects of the CeO2 coating on the response of osteoblasts to H2O2-induced oxidative stress have been demonstrated in terms of cell viability, apoptosis and differentiation. The CeO2 coating reversed the reduced superoxide dismutase activity, decreased reactive oxygen species production and suppressed malondialdehyde formation in H2O2-treated osteoblasts. It indicated that the CeO2 coating can preserve the intracellular antioxidant defense system. The cytocompatibility of the CeO2 coating was further assessed in vitro by cell viability assay and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Taken together, the CeO2 coating could provide an opportunity to be utilized as a potential candidate for bone regeneration under oxidative stress.

PMID:
27091042
DOI:
10.1007/s10856-016-5710-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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