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Ann Intern Med. 2016 Jun 7;164(11):740-51. doi: 10.7326/M15-2650. Epub 2016 Apr 19.

Diabetes Medications as Monotherapy or Metformin-Based Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Clinicians and patients need updated evidence on the comparative effectiveness and safety of diabetes medications to make informed treatment choices.

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of monotherapy (thiazolidinediones, metformin, sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 [DPP-4] inhibitors, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 [SGLT-2] inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] receptor agonists) and selected metformin-based combinations in adults with type 2 diabetes.

DATA SOURCES:

English-language studies from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, indexed from inception through March 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through December 2015).

STUDY SELECTION:

Paired reviewers independently identified 179 trials and 25 observational studies of head-to-head monotherapy or metformin-based combinations.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Two reviewers independently assessed study quality and serially extracted data and graded the strength of evidence.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Cardiovascular mortality was lower for metformin versus sulfonylureas; the evidence on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular morbidity, and microvascular complications was insufficient or of low strength. Reductions in hemoglobin A1c values were similar across monotherapies and metformin-based combinations, except that DPP-4 inhibitors had smaller effects. Body weight was reduced or maintained with metformin, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 receptor agonists, and SGLT-2 inhibitors and increased with sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and insulin (between-group differences up to 5 kg). Hypoglycemia was more frequent with sulfonylureas. Gastrointestinal adverse events were highest with metformin and GLP-1 receptor agonists. Genital mycotic infections were increased with SGLT-2 inhibitors.

LIMITATION:

Most studies were short, with limited ability to assess rare safety and long-term clinical outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

The evidence supports metformin as first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes, given its relative safety and beneficial effects on hemoglobin A1c, weight, and cardiovascular mortality (compared with sulfonylureas). On the basis of less evidence, results for add-on therapies to metformin were similar to those for monotherapies.

PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE:

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

PMID:
27088241
DOI:
10.7326/M15-2650
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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