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Oral Dis. 2016 Sep;22(6):557-65. doi: 10.1111/odi.12492. Epub 2016 May 27.

Associations of sleep bruxism with age, sleep apnea, and daytime problematic behaviors in children.

Author information

1
United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Suita, Japan.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan.
3
Department of Oral Anatomy and Neurobiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Japan.
4
Sleep Medicine Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Japan.
5
Ota Memorial Sleep Center, Kanagawa, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of sleep bruxism in children in Japan, and its relationships with sleep-related factors and daytime problematic behavior.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Guardians of 6023 children aged 2-12 years completed the Japanese Sleep Questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling were performed.

RESULTS:

Sleep bruxism was reported in 21.0% children (n = 1263): the prevalence was highest in the age group of 5-7 years (27.4%). Multiple regression analysis showed that sleep bruxism had significant correlations with age 5-7 years (OR: 1.72; P < 0.0001), 'Moves a lot during sleep' (OR: 1.47; P < 0.0001), 'sleeps with mouth open' (OR: 1.56; P < 0.0001), and 'snores loudly' (OR: 1.80; P < 0.0001). In structural equation modeling, sleep bruxism had a significant but weak direct effect on daytime problematic behavior, while sleep bruxism significantly correlated with obstructive sleep apnea, which had a higher direct effect on daytime problematic behavior.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep bruxism was reported in 21.0% of Japanese children and had independent relationships with age, movements during sleep, and snoring. A comorbidity of sleep-disordered breathing might be related to daytime problematic behavior in children with sleep bruxism.

KEYWORDS:

co-sleeping; community samples; development; sleep-disordered breathing; tooth grinding

PMID:
27087630
DOI:
10.1111/odi.12492
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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