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Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 2016 Sep-Oct;44(5):400-9. doi: 10.1016/j.aller.2015.12.002. Epub 2016 Apr 15.

Effect of foods and Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and first years of life on wheezing, rhinitis and dermatitis in preschoolers.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Division of Public Health, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: jacastro17@hotmail.com.
2
Allery Unit, Santa Lucia University Hospital, Cartagena, Spain.
3
Division of Public Health, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
4
Pediatric Allergy and Pulmonology Units, "Virgen de la Arrixaca" University Children's Hospital, University of Murcia and IMIB-Arrixaca Research Institute, Murcia, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a conflictive position if some foods and Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) consumed by the mother during pregnancy and by the child during the first years of life can be protective for current wheezing, rhinitis and dermatitis at preschool age.

METHODS:

Questionnaires of epidemiological factors and food intake by the mother during pregnancy and later by the child were filled in by parents in two surveys at two different time points (1.5 yrs and 4 yrs of life) in 1000 preschoolers.

RESULTS:

The prevalences of current wheezing, rhinitis and dermatitis were 18.8%, 10.4%, and 17.2%, respectively. After multiple logistic analysis children who were low fruit consumers (never/occasionally) and high fast-food consumers (≥3 times/week) had a higher risk for current wheezing; while intermediate consumption of meat (1 or 2 times/week) and low of pasta by mothers in pregnancy were protected. For current rhinitis, low fruit consumer children were at higher risk; while those consuming meat <3 times/week were protected. For current dermatitis, high fast food consumption by mothers in pregnancy; and low or high consumption of fruit, and high of potatoes in children were associated to higher prevalence. Children consuming fast food >1 times/week were protected for dermatitis. MedDiet adherence by mother and child did not remain a protective factor for any outcome.

CONCLUSION:

Low consumption of fruits and high of meat by the child, and high consumption of potatoes and pasta by the mother had a negative effect on wheezing, rhinitis or dermatitis; while fast food consumption was inconsistent.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Childhood; Dermatitis; Food during pregnancy; Mediterranean diet; Primary prevention; Rhinitis; Risk factors; Wheeze

PMID:
27087566
DOI:
10.1016/j.aller.2015.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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