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Cell. 2016 Apr 21;165(3):566-79. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.063. Epub 2016 Apr 14.

Asprosin, a Fasting-Induced Glucogenic Protein Hormone.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
  • 2Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
  • 3Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
  • 4Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
  • 5Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
  • 6Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
  • 7Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: chopra@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Hepatic glucose release into the circulation is vital for brain function and survival during periods of fasting and is modulated by an array of hormones that precisely regulate plasma glucose levels. We have identified a fasting-induced protein hormone that modulates hepatic glucose release. It is the C-terminal cleavage product of profibrillin, and we name it Asprosin. Asprosin is secreted by white adipose, circulates at nanomolar levels, and is recruited to the liver, where it activates the G protein-cAMP-PKA pathway, resulting in rapid glucose release into the circulation. Humans and mice with insulin resistance show pathologically elevated plasma asprosin, and its loss of function via immunologic or genetic means has a profound glucose- and insulin-lowering effect secondary to reduced hepatic glucose release. Asprosin represents a glucogenic protein hormone, and therapeutically targeting it may be beneficial in type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
27087445
PMCID:
PMC4852710
[Available on 2017-04-21]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.063
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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