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Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging. 2016 May 30;251:7-14. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2016.04.001. Epub 2016 Apr 7.

Dopamine efflux in response to ultraviolet radiation in addicted sunbed users.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, USA.
2
Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, Molecular Neuroimaging, LLC, and Yale University, New Haven, MA, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, USA.
5
Center for Brain Health, University of Texas Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, USA; Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, USA; VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: bryon.adinoff@utsouthwestern.edu.

Abstract

Compulsive tanning despite awareness of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) carcinogenicity may represent an "addictive" behavior. Many addictive disorders are associated with alterations in dopamine (D2/D3) receptor binding and dopamine reactivity in the brain's reward pathway. To determine if compulsive tanners exhibited neurobiologic responses similar to other addictive disorders, this study assessed basal striatal D2/D3 binding and UVR-induced striatal dopamine efflux in ten addicted and ten infrequent tanners. In a double-blind crossover trial, UVR or sham UVR was administered in separate sessions during brain imaging with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Basal D2/D3 receptor density and UVR-induced dopamine efflux in the caudate were assessed using (123)I-iodobenzamide ((123)I-IBZM) binding potential non-displaceable (BPnd). Basal BPnd did not significantly differ between addicted and infrequent tanners. Whereas neither UVR nor sham UVR induced significant changes in bilateral caudate BPnd in either group, post-hoc analyses revealed left caudate BPnd significantly decreased (reflecting increased dopamine efflux) in the addicted tanners - but not the infrequent tanners - during the UVR session only. Bilateral ∆BPnd correlated with tanning severity only in the addicted tanners. These preliminary findings are consistent with a stronger neural rewarding response to UVR in addicted tanners, supporting a cutaneous-neural connection driving excessive sunbed use.

KEYWORDS:

Addiction; Dopamine; Imaging; Mesostriatal reward system; SPECT; Tanning

PMID:
27085608
PMCID:
PMC5241090
DOI:
10.1016/j.pscychresns.2016.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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