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Seizure. 2016 May;38:32-7. doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2016.03.012. Epub 2016 Apr 2.

Risk factors for comorbid psychopathology in youth with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

Author information

1
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University, 225 E. Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address: splioply@luriechildrens.org.
2
Minnesota Epilepsy Group, 225 Smith Ave. N., St. Paul, MN 55102, USA.
3
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA.
4
Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Neurologic Institute, 9500 Euclid Ave/P57, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.
5
Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
6
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy St. - Potter B, Providence, RI 02903, USA.
7
Stony Brook University Medical Center, Putnam Hall-South Campus, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine the risk factors for internalizing (anxiety, depression) and posttraumatic stress (PTSD) disorders, somatization, and anxiety sensitivity (AS) in youth with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

METHODS:

55 probands with PNES and 35 siblings, aged 8-18 years, underwent a psychiatric interview, cognitive and language testing, and completed somatization and AS questionnaires. Parents provided the subjects' medical, psychiatric, family, and adversity history information.

RESULTS:

The risk factors for the probands' internalizing disorders (girls, older age of PNES onset), somatization (older age, epilepsy), and anxiety sensitivity (girls, adversities) differed from their siblings. The risk factors in the siblings, however, were similar to the general pediatric population. Proband depression was unrelated to the study's risk variables while PTSD was significantly associated with female gender and lower Full Scale IQ.

CONCLUSIONS:

Knowledge about the specificity of the risk factors for comorbid psychopathology in youth with PNES might facilitate their early identification and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Children; Depression; Psychogenic; Psychopathology; Seizures

PMID:
27085102
DOI:
10.1016/j.seizure.2016.03.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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