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Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2016 May;20(5):696-703. doi: 10.5588/ijtld.15.0796.

Solar-powered oxygen delivery: proof of concept.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Mulago Hospital and Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
4
Department of Paediatrics, Jinja Regional Referral Hospital, Jinja, Uganda.
5
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Mulago Hospital and Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Sandra A Rotman Laboratories, McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, Toronto, Canada; McLaughlin Centre for Molecular Medicine, Toronto, Tropical Disease Unit, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Department of Paediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

SETTING:

A resource-limited paediatric hospital in Uganda.

OBJECTIVE:

Pneumonia is a leading cause of child mortality worldwide. Access to life-saving oxygen therapy is limited in many areas. We designed and implemented a solar-powered oxygen delivery system for the treatment of paediatric pneumonia.

DESIGN:

Proof-of-concept pilot study. A solar-powered oxygen delivery system was designed and piloted in a cohort of children with hypoxaemic illness.

RESULTS:

The system consisted of 25 × 80 W photovoltaic solar panels (daily output 7.5 kWh [range 3.8-9.7kWh]), 8 × 220 Ah batteries and a 300 W oxygen concentrator (output up to 5 l/min oxygen at 88% [±2%] purity). A series of 28 patients with hypoxaemia were treated with solar-powered oxygen. Immediate improvement in peripheral blood oxygen saturation was documented (median change +12% [range 5-15%], P < 0.0001). Tachypnoea, tachycardia and composite illness severity score improved over the first 24 h of hospitalisation (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). The case fatality rate was 6/28 (21%). The median recovery times to sit, eat, wean oxygen and hospital discharge were respectively 7.5 h, 9.8 h, 44 h and 4 days.

CONCLUSION:

Solar energy can be used to concentrate oxygen from ambient air and oxygenate children with respiratory distress and hypoxaemia in a resource-limited setting.

Comment in

PMID:
27084827
DOI:
10.5588/ijtld.15.0796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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