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Vaccine. 2016 May 17;34(23):2531-6. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.092. Epub 2016 Apr 12.

A systematic review of human-to-human transmission of measles vaccine virus.

Author information

1
UQ Child Health Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
2
Drug Department, Saudi Food and Drug Authority, Saudi Arabia.
3
UQ Child Health Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
4
UQ Child Health Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Communicable Diseases Branch, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: sblambert@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

Measles is one of the most contagious human diseases. Administration of the live attenuated measles vaccine has substantially reduced childhood mortality and morbidity since its licensure in 1963. The live but attenuated form of the vaccine describes a virus poorly adapted to replicating in human tissue, but with a replication yield sufficient to elicit an immune response for long-term protection. Given the high transmissibility of the wild-type virus and that transmission of other live vaccine viruses has been documented, we conducted a systematic review to establish if there is any evidence of human-to-human transmission of the live attenuated measles vaccine virus. We reviewed 773 articles for genotypic confirmation of a vaccine virus transmitted from a recently vaccinated individual to a susceptible close contact. No evidence of human-to-human transmission of the measles vaccine virus has been reported amongst the thousands of clinical samples genotyped during outbreaks or endemic transmission and individual case studies worldwide.

KEYWORDS:

Genotype; Measles; RT-PCR; Transmission; Vaccine

PMID:
27083423
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.092
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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