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J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2017 Feb;30(3):267-271. Epub 2016 May 5.

Immediate postpartum glycemic control and risk of surgical site infection.

Author information

1
a Miller Women's & Children's Hospital Long Beach , Long Beach , CA , USA.
2
b University of California Irvine Health , Orange , CA , USA.
3
c San Diego Perinatal Center , San Diego , CA , USA and.
4
d Women's Care of Alaska , Anchorage , AK , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Nearly one-third of all births in the United States in 2013 were by cesarean delivery, with 6% complicated by diabetes. The purpose of this study was to correlate immediate postoperative hyperglycemia with wound morbidity in diabetic women who underwent cesarean delivery.

METHODS:

This retrospective case-control study was performed at UC Irvine Health and Miller Women's & Children's Hospital Long Beach between 2009 and 2015. Subjects included women with at least Class B diabetes mellitus who underwent cesarean birth. Fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels (BGL) were recorded daily during postoperative days one through four. Outcomes included abscess formation, cellulitis, wound separation, fascial dehiscence, hospital readmission, secondary wound closure, antibiotic treatment, and a composite of the above.

RESULTS:

Outcomes were evaluated for 176 subjects. Twenty-nine experienced wound complications. Women readmitted for wound complications and those with composite morbidity experienced significantly higher mean fasting BGL, however, BGL during the immediate postoperative setting were not predictive of wound morbidity.

CONCLUSION:

In our cohort of diabetic women who underwent cesarean delivery, immediate postoperative hyperglycemia was not associated with wound morbidity.

KEYWORDS:

Cesarean; diabetes mellitus; hyperglycemia; wound morbidity

PMID:
27079122
DOI:
10.3109/14767058.2016.1173672
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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