Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biol Trace Elem Res. 2016 Nov;174(1):32-39. Epub 2016 Apr 13.

Trace Element Alterations in the Hair of Diabetic and Obese Women.

Author information

1
Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box: 715, Makkah, 21955, Saudi Arabia.
2
Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box: 715, Makkah, 21955, Saudi Arabia. Saleh-A-S@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Alterations in the trace element content can induce metabolic disorders as these elements are involved in the regulation of metabolism. Obesity increases the likelihood of various diseases, particularly cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and is more prevalent in Saudi Arabia, especially in women. This study explored the potential of alterations in hair trace elements as long-term markers in diabetic and/or obese Saudi females. In total, 65 diabetic obese women, 47 non-diabetic obese women, and 70 normal-weight women were recruited. Clinical and familial history and anthropometric variables were recorded. Hair Se, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe levels were analyzed. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and lipid profile were analyzed. Our findings revealed a marked decrease of hair Zn, Mn, and Fe and elevated Se and Cu levels in obese women. In addition, Zn and Fe levels were decreased in diabetic women. Thus, the metabolic distress occurring in obesity and hyperglycemia may affect trace element status by increasing the excretion and decreasing the bioavailability of trace elements or redistributing them among various pools. Hair trace elements can serve as important long-term markers for metabolic disorders; however, larger prospective studies are warranted to validate their diagnostic and follow-up utilities.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus; Hair; Obesity; Saudi Arabia; Trace elements; Women

PMID:
27075547
DOI:
10.1007/s12011-016-0691-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center