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Sci Rep. 2016 Apr 13;6:24195. doi: 10.1038/srep24195.

Establishment of clival chordoma cell line MUG-CC1 and lymphoblastoid cells as a model for potential new treatment strategies.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.
2
Department of General Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.
3
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.
4
Division of Biomedical Research, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.
5
Institute of Human Genetics, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.
6
Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.

Abstract

Chordomas are rare malignant tumors that develop from embryonic remnants of the notochord and arise only in the midline from the clivus to the sacrum. Surgery followed by radiotherapy is the standard treatment. As chordomas are resistant to standard chemotherapy, further treatment options are urgently needed. We describe the establishment of a clivus chordoma cell line, MUG-CC1. The cell line is characterized according to its morphology, immunohistochemistry, and growth kinetics. During establishment, cell culture supernatants were collected, and the growth factors HGF, SDF-1, FGF2, and PDGF analyzed using xMAP(®) technology. A spontaneous lymphoblastoid EBV-positive cell line was also developed and characterized. MUG-CC1 is strongly positive for brachyury, cytokeratin, and S100. The cell line showed gains of the entire chromosomes 7, 8, 12, 13, 16, 18, and 20, and high level gains on chromosomes 1q21-1q24 and 17q21-17q25. During cultivation, there was significant expression of HGF and SDF-1 compared to continuous chordoma cell lines. A new, well-characterized clival chordoma cell line, as well as a non-tumorigenic lymphoblastoid cell line should serve as an in vitro model for the development of potential new treatment strategies for patients suffering from this disease.

PMID:
27072875
PMCID:
PMC4829844
DOI:
10.1038/srep24195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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