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J Proteomics. 2016 Jun 30;143:353-364. doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2016.04.003. Epub 2016 Apr 9.

Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of wild and domesticated Opuntia spp. species shows a metabolic adaptation through domestication.

Author information

1
Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale-Fédération de Recherche Agrobiosciences, Interactions et Biodiversité, CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 205 route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse, France; Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 205 route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse, France.
2
IPICyT, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
3
Facultad de Ciencias Químicas de la Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
4
Instituto de Investigación en Zonas Desérticas, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
5
Toxalim, Université de Toulouse, INRA, INP-ENVT, INP-EI-Purpan, Université de Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France.
6
INSERM UMR 1048, Toulouse, France.
7
Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 205 route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse, France.
8
Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale-Fédération de Recherche Agrobiosciences, Interactions et Biodiversité, CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 205 route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse, France; Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 205 route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse, France. Electronic address: carole.pichereaux@ipbs.fr.
9
IPICyT, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Electronic address: apbarba@ipicyt.edu.mx.

Abstract

The Opuntia genus is widely distributed in America, but the highest richness of wild species are found in Mexico, as well as the most domesticated Opuntia ficus-indica, which is the most domesticated species and an important crop in agricultural economies of arid and semiarid areas worldwide. During domestication process, the Opuntia morphological characteristics were favored, such as less and smaller spines in cladodes and less seeds in fruits, but changes at molecular level are almost unknown. To obtain more insights about the Opuntia molecular changes through domestication, a shotgun proteomic analysis and database-dependent searches by homology was carried out. >1000 protein species were identified and by using a label-free quantitation method, the Opuntia proteomes were compared in order to identify differentially accumulated proteins among wild and domesticated species. Most of the changes were observed in glucose, secondary, and 1C metabolism, which correlate with the observed protein, fiber and phenolic compounds accumulation in Opuntia cladodes. Regulatory proteins, ribosomal proteins, and proteins related with response to stress were also observed in differential accumulation. These results provide new valuable data that will help to the understanding of the molecular changes of Opuntia species through domestication.

BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Opuntia species are well adapted to dry and warm conditions in arid and semiarid regions worldwide, and they are highly productive plants showing considerable promises as an alternative food source. However, there is a gap regarding Opuntia molecular mechanisms that enable them to grow in extreme environmental conditions and how the domestication processes has changed them. In the present study, a shotgun analysis was carried out to characterize the proteomes of five Opuntia species selected by its domestication degree. Our results will help to a better understanding of proteomic features underlying the selection and specialization under evolution and domestication of Opuntia and will provide a platform for basic biology research and gene discovery.

KEYWORDS:

1C-metabolism; Carbohydrate metabolism; Domestication; LC-MS/MS; Opuntia spp.; Shotgun analysis

PMID:
27072113
DOI:
10.1016/j.jprot.2016.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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