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Nat Commun. 2016 Apr 13;7:11221. doi: 10.1038/ncomms11221.

Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy.

Author information

  • 1Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA.
  • 2Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7030 Trondheim, Norway.
  • 3Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA.
  • 4IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA.
  • 5Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, The Netherlands.
  • 6Department of Physics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7030 Trondheim, Norway.
  • 7The HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA.
  • 8Department of Medical Biochemistry, Academic Medical Center, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery.

PMID:
27071376
PMCID:
PMC4833858
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms11221
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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