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PLoS One. 2016 Apr 12;11(4):e0153376. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0153376. eCollection 2016.

Stroke Damage Is Exacerbated by Nano-Size Particulate Matter in a Mouse Model.

Author information

1
Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
2
Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
4
Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
5
Department of Neurobiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.

Abstract

This study examines the effects of nano-size particulate matter (nPM) exposure in the setting of murine reperfused stroke. Particulate matter is a potent source of inflammation and oxidative stress. These processes are known to influence stroke progression through recruitment of marginally viable penumbral tissue into the ischemic core. nPM was collected in an urban area in central Los Angeles, impacted primarily by traffic emissions. Re-aerosolized nPM or filtered air was then administered to mice through whole body exposure chambers for forty-five cumulative hours. Exposed mice then underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion/ reperfusion. Following cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion, mice exposed to nPM exhibited significantly larger infarct volumes and less favorable neurological deficit scores when compared to mice exposed to filtered air. Mice exposed to nPM also demonstrated increases in markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in the region of the ischemic core. The findings suggest a detrimental effect of urban airborne particulate matter exposure in the setting of acute ischemic stroke.

PMID:
27071057
PMCID:
PMC4829199
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0153376
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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