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Transl Psychiatry. 2016 Apr 12;6:e781. doi: 10.1038/tp.2016.45.

Training sensory signal-to-noise resolution in children with ADHD in a global mental health setting.

Author information

1
Sandler Neurosciences Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
4
Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
5
Posit Science Corporation, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impaired focus on goal-relevant signals and fail to suppress goal-irrelevant distractions. To address both these issues, we developed a novel neuroplasticity-based training program that adaptively trains the resolution of challenging sensory signals and the suppression of progressively more challenging distractions. We evaluated this sensory signal-to-noise resolution training in a small sample, global mental health study in Indian children with ADHD. The children trained for 30 h over 6 months in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Training completers showed steady and significant improvements in ADHD-associated behaviors from baseline to post training relative to controls, and benefits sustained in a 6-month follow-up. Post-training cognitive assessments showed significant positive results for response inhibition and Stroop interference tests in training completers vs controls, while measures of sustained attention and short-term memory showed nonsignificant improvement trends. Further, training-driven improvements in distractor suppression correlated with the improved ADHD symptoms. This initial study suggests utility of signal-to-noise resolution training for children with ADHD; it emphasizes the need for further research on this intervention and substantially informs the design of a larger trial.

PMID:
27070409
PMCID:
PMC4872403
DOI:
10.1038/tp.2016.45
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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