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Span J Psychol. 2016 Apr 12;19:E16. doi: 10.1017/sjp.2016.16.

Prejudice, Social Dominance, and Similarity among People who Favor Integration of Minorities.

Author information

1
Universidad de Murcia (Spain).
2
Universidad de la Frontera (Chile).
3
CARM- SEF (Spain).

Abstract

This study examines differences in prejudice, perceived similarity, and social dominance in members of the majority who favor integration as a means of minority acculturation. A total of 342 non-Gypsy Spanish participants filled out a questionnaire about their relationship to one of three outgroups: Maghrebians, Gypsies, and Latin Americans. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that a three-cluster solution was most fitting for every outgroup. ANOVAs applied to the three clusters indicated significant differences in prejudice, perceived similarity, and social dominance. Referring to Gypsies the largest effect size was observed in manifest prejudice (η2 = .63), in Maghrebians, the largest effect size was observed in subtle prejudice (η2 =.77), while for Latin Americans, perceived similarity had the largest effect size η2 ( = .60). The results reveal a need to modify existing measures of integration; we recommend using questionnaires to measure behaviors that members of the majority would be willing to implement.

KEYWORDS:

integration; minorities; prejudice; similarity; social dominance

PMID:
27068355
DOI:
10.1017/sjp.2016.16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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