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J Geriatr Oncol. 2016 May;7(3):195-200. doi: 10.1016/j.jgo.2016.03.002. Epub 2016 Apr 7.

Quality of life in older and frail patients after surgery for colorectal cancer-A follow-up study.

Author information

1
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, PB 4956, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PB 1078, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: benedronning@gmail.com.
2
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, PB 4956, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PB 1078, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.b.wyller@medisin.uio.no.
3
K.G. Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre, Oslo University Hospital, PB 4956, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Centre for Cancer Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PB 1078, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway; Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, PB 4956, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PB 1078, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: arild.nesbakken@medisin.uio.no.
4
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, PB 8905, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: eva.skovlund@ntnu.no.
5
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PB 1078, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway; Cancer Unit, Innlandet Hospital Trust, PB 104, 2381 Brumunddal, Norway. Electronic address: mjorhoy@gmail.com.
6
Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, PB 1000, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. Electronic address: arne.bakka@gmail.com.
7
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, PB 4956, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: srostoft@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The incidence of colorectal cancer is increasing, mainly due to the aging of the population. Frailty, describing a state of increased vulnerability, is common in older patients, but frailty and high age are not necessarily contraindications to surgical treatment. However, limited data describing long-term outcomes after surgery in this patient group exist. In this clinical follow-up study, we aimed to examine long-term health-related quality of life in older surgical patients with colorectal cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Patients were recruited from a prospective multicenter study investigating frailty as a predictor of postoperative complications after surgery for colorectal cancer. A preoperative geriatric assessment was performed, and patients were classified as frail or non-frail. Patients responded to version 3.0 of The European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 before surgery, 3months postoperatively and at a long-term follow-up 16-28months (median 22months) after surgery. One-way repeated-measures analyses of variance were performed to examine changes in scores over time.

RESULTS:

180 patients with a mean age of 80years were included at baseline, 138 at 3months postoperatively, and 84 patients (69% of survivors) at long-term follow-up. A significant improvement in quality of life-scores was present 3months after surgery, also in the subgroup of frail patients. At long-term follow-up, scores decreased, but to values above baseline.

CONCLUSION:

Health-related quality of life may be improved in older patients after surgery for colorectal cancer, even in patients who are classified as frail preoperatively.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal neoplasia; Colorectal surgery; Frail elderly; Quality of life

PMID:
27067579
DOI:
10.1016/j.jgo.2016.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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