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Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016 Mar;6:87-92. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2016.02.011. Epub 2016 Feb 12.

A case-control study of dietary salt intake in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
UCSF Regional Pediatric MS Center, San Francisco, CA, United States.
2
Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
3
Department of Neurology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX, United States.
4
Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO, United States.
5
Lourie Center for Pediatric MS, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, United States.
6
Department of Neurology, UT Southwestern, Dallas, TX, United States.
7
The Pediatric MS Center at the Jacobs Neurological Institute, SUNY Buffalo, NY, United States.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, United States.
9
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.
10
Alabama Pediatric MS Center, Birmingham, AL, United States.
11
Department of Pediatric Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States.
12
Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States.
13
Pediatric MS and Related Disorders Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
14
Partners Pediatric MS Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
15
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States.
16
School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States.
17
School of Public Health, Public Health Nutrition, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States.
18
Department of Neurology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States.
19
UCSF Regional Pediatric MS Center, San Francisco, CA, United States. Electronic address: emmanuelle.waubant@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High salt intake may be associated with pro-inflammatory changes in the immune response, and increased clinical and MRI activity in adults with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to determine if dietary salt intake is associated with pediatric-onset MS risk in a multicenter, case-control study.

METHODS:

Pediatric-onset CIS/MS cases within four years of onset and controls less than 22 years old recruited from 14 pediatric-MS centers were studied. Dietary sodium intake was assessed using the validated Block Kids Food Screener (NutritionQuest). Sodium intake, excess sodium, and sodium terciles were compared between cases and controls. Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, and socioeconomic status.

RESULTS:

Among 170 cases (mean age=15.2±3.5) and 331 controls (mean age=14.0±3.7), no significant difference in unadjusted mean sodium intake was found between cases (2044mg/d) and controls (2030mg/d, p=0.99). The proportion of subjects consuming excess sodium, based on the adequate intake for age and gender, was similar between cases and controls (65% versus 69%, p=0.34). There were no increased odds of higher sodium intake among cases as compared to controls (for each 100mg/d increase in sodium, OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.98, 1.02; p=0.93, for excess sodium intake, OR=1.05, 95% CI 0.67, 1.64; p=0.84).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results show no strong association between dietary salt intake and pediatric-onset MS risk, suggesting that salt intake may not play a prominent role in susceptibility to MS in children.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary factors; Epidemiology; Multiple sclerosis; Pediatric; Salt; Susceptibility

PMID:
27063630
PMCID:
PMC4830915
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.msard.2016.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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