Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Electrophoresis. 2016 Jul;37(12):1704-17. doi: 10.1002/elps.201500393. Epub 2016 May 9.

Proteomic changes in the liver of Channa striatus in response to high temperature stress.

Author information

1
ICAR-Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute, FREM Division, Barrackpore, Kolkata, India.
2
KIIT School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to investigate the proteomic changes in the liver of murrel Channa striatus exposed to high temperature stress. Fishes were exposed to 36°C for 4 days and liver proteome changes were analyzed using gel- based proteomics, i.e. 2DE, MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, and validation by transcript analysis. The study showed, besides others, increased abundance of two sets of proteins, the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ferritin, cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and the chaperones HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase; this was validated by transcript analysis. The proteome data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002608. Further, gene expression analysis was also carried out in the fishes exposed to thermal stress for longer durations (30 days experimental exposure in laboratory and for 30 days beyond, taking Channa collected from a hot spring runoff at 36-38°C); sod, gst, crbp, and hsp60 were found to continue to remain upregulated at eight-, 2.5-, 2.4-, and 2.45-fold, respectively, in the hot spring runoff fish. Pathway analysis showed that the upregulations of the antioxidant enzymes as well as molecular chaperones are induced by the transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). Thus, while short-term heat stress tolerance involves the antioxidative enzymes SOD, ferritin, CRBP, GST, and chaperones HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase, adaptation under chronic heat stress is associated with SOD, CRBP, GST, and HSP60.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidative enzymes; Channa striatus; High temperature stress; Liver proteome; Stress response

PMID:
27058960
DOI:
10.1002/elps.201500393
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center