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Water Res. 2016 Jun 1;96:217-24. doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2016.03.056. Epub 2016 Mar 26.

Inactivation of invasive marine species in the process of conveying ballast water using OH based on a strong ionization discharge.

Author information

1
Fujian Collaborative Innovation Center for Exploitation and Utilization of Marine Biological Resources, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361005, China. Electronic address: mindong-bai@163.com.
2
Fujian Collaborative Innovation Center for Exploitation and Utilization of Marine Biological Resources, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361005, China.
3
Environmental Engineering Institute, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning, 116026, China.
4
Environmental Engineering Institute, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning, 116026, China. Electronic address: newzhangzhitao@163.com.

Abstract

In this paper, invasive marine species in medium-salinity ballast water were inactivated using OH generated from a strong ionization discharge. The OH is determined by the concentration of oxygen active species combined with the effects of water jet cavitation. The results indicated that the OH concentration reached 7.62 μM, within 1 s, which is faster and higher than in conventional AOP methods. In a pilot-scale OH ballast water system with a capacity of 10 m(3)/h, algae were inactivated when CT value was 0.1 mg min/L with a contact time only 6 s. The viable and nonviable cells were determined using SYTOX Green nucleic acid stain and Flow cytometry. As a result, the OH treatment could be completed during the process of conveying the ballast water. In addition, the concentrations of relevant disinfection by-products (DBPs), such as trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), and bromate, were less than that required by the World Health Organization's drinking water standards, which suggest that the discharged ballast water posed no risks to the oceanic environment. Nevertheless, for conventional ozonation and electrolysis methods, the ballast water should be treated only in the treated tanks during the ship's voyage and form higher level DBPs.

KEYWORDS:

A strong ionization discharge; Hydroxyl radical (OH); Inactivation; Invasive organisms; Oxidation by-products

PMID:
27058879
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2016.03.056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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