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Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2017 Aug;37(3):268-282. doi: 10.3109/01942638.2016.1150384. Epub 2016 Apr 8.

Effects of Botulinum Toxin-A and Goal-Directed Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy GMFCS Levels I & II.

Author information

1
a Department of Women's and Children's Health , Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden.
2
b KTH Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology , Stockholm , Sweden.
3
c KTH BioMEx Center, Royal Institute of Technology , Stockholm , Sweden.

Abstract

AIMS:

To evaluate short and long-term effects of botulinum toxin-A combined with goal-directed physiotherapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP).

METHOD:

A consecutive selection of 40 children, ages 4-12 years, diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral CP, and classified in GMFCS levels I-II. During the 24 months, 9 children received one BoNT-A injection, 10 children two injections, 11 children three injections, and 10 children received four injections. 3D gait analysis, goal-attainment scaling, and body function assessments were performed before and at 3, 12, and 24 months after initial injections.

RESULTS:

A significant but clinically small long-term improvement in gait was observed. Plantarflexor spasticity was reduced after three months and remained stable, while passive ankle dorsiflexion increased after 3 months but decreased slightly after 12 months. Goal-attainment gradually increased, reached the highest levels at 12 months, and levels were maintained at 24 months.

CONCLUSION:

The treatments' positive effect on spasticity reduction was identified, but did not relate to improvement in gait or goal-attainment. No long-term positive change in passive ankle dorsiflexion was observed. Goal attainment was achieved in all except four children. The clinical significance of the improved gait is unclear. Further studies are recommended to identify predictors for positive treatment outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort study; cerebral palsy; gait and motor control; mobility

PMID:
27058177
DOI:
10.3109/01942638.2016.1150384
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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