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Int Rev Neurobiol. 2016;126:293-355. doi: 10.1016/bs.irn.2016.02.014.

Genes and Alcohol Consumption: Studies with Mutant Mice.

Author information

1
Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States.
2
Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, United States.
3
Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States. Electronic address: harris@austin.utexas.edu.

Abstract

In this chapter, we review the effects of global null mutant and overexpressing transgenic mouse lines on voluntary self-administration of alcohol. We examine approximately 200 publications pertaining to the effects of 155 mouse genes on alcohol consumption in different drinking models. The targeted genes vary in function and include neurotransmitter, ion channel, neuroimmune, and neuropeptide signaling systems. The alcohol self-administration models include operant conditioning, two- and four-bottle choice continuous and intermittent access, drinking in the dark limited access, chronic intermittent ethanol, and scheduled high alcohol consumption tests. Comparisons of different drinking models using the same mutant mice are potentially the most informative, and we will highlight those examples. More mutants have been tested for continuous two-bottle choice consumption than any other test; of the 137 mouse genes examined using this model, 97 (72%) altered drinking in at least one sex. Overall, the effects of genetic manipulations on alcohol drinking often depend on the sex of the mice, alcohol concentration and time of access, genetic background, as well as the drinking test.

KEYWORDS:

Continuous and intermittent two-bottle choice; Drinking in the dark; Global homozygous knockout; Knockin; Operant; Scheduled high alcohol consumption; Transgenic overexpression; Voluntary self-administration

PMID:
27055617
PMCID:
PMC5302130
DOI:
10.1016/bs.irn.2016.02.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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