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AIDS Behav. 2016 Sep;20(9):2045-53. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1385-y.

Relationship Power and Sexual Violence Among HIV-Positive Women in Rural Uganda.

Author information

1
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, Department of Medicine, University of California - San Francisco, 550 16th Street 3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA, USA. amy.conroy@ucsf.edu.
2
Center for Global Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Kaiser Permanente, San Franscisco, USA.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Mbarara University of Science & Technology, Mbarara, Uganda.
5
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
6
Division of HIV/AIDS, Department of Medicine, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
7
Department of Epidemiology, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, USA.

Abstract

Gender-based power imbalances place women at significant risk for sexual violence, however, little research has examined this association among women living with HIV/AIDS. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of relationship power and sexual violence among HIV-positive women on anti-retroviral therapy in rural Uganda. Relationship power was measured using the Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS), a validated measure consisting of two subscales: relationship control (RC) and decision-making dominance. We used multivariable logistic regression to test for associations between the SRPS and two dependent variables: recent forced sex and transactional sex. Higher relationship power (full SRPS) was associated with reduced odds of forced sex (AOR = 0.24; 95 % CI 0.07-0.80; p = 0.020). The association between higher relationship power and transactional sex was strong and in the expected direction, but not statistically significant (AOR = 0.47; 95 % CI 0.18-1.22; p = 0.119). Higher RC was associated with reduced odds of both forced sex (AOR = 0.18; 95 % CI 0.06-0.59; p < 0.01) and transactional sex (AOR = 0.38; 95 % CI 0.15-0.99; p = 0.048). Violence prevention interventions with HIV-positive women should consider approaches that increase women's power in their relationships.

KEYWORDS:

Africa; HIV/AIDS; Relationship power; Sexual violence; Transactional sex

PMID:
27052844
PMCID:
PMC4996683
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-016-1385-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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