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Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2016 Jun;158(6):1213-9. doi: 10.1007/s00701-016-2781-9. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

A neurosurgical simulation of skull base tumors using a 3D printed rapid prototyping model containing mesh structures.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery (Omori), School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1, Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo, 143-8541, Japan.
2
Department of Neurosurgery (Omori), School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1, Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo, 143-8541, Japan. nsugo@med.toho-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Deep regions are not visible in three-dimensional (3D) printed rapid prototyping (RP) models prepared from opaque materials, which is not the case with translucent images. The objectives of this study were to develop an RP model in which a skull base tumor was simulated using mesh, and to investigate its usefulness for surgical simulations by evaluating the visibility of its deep regions.

METHODS:

A 3D printer that employs binder jetting and is mainly used to prepare plaster models was used. RP models containing a solid tumor, no tumor, and a mesh tumor were prepared based on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and angiographic data for four cases of petroclival tumor. Twelve neurosurgeons graded the three types of RP model into the following four categories: 'clearly visible,' 'visible,' 'difficult to see,' and 'invisible,' based on the visibility of the internal carotid artery, basilar artery, and brain stem through a craniotomy performed via the combined transpetrosal approach. In addition, the 3D positional relationships between these structures and the tumor were assessed.

RESULTS:

The internal carotid artery, basilar artery, and brain stem and the positional relationships of these structures with the tumor were significantly more visible in the RP models with mesh tumors than in the RP models with solid or no tumors.

CONCLUSIONS:

The deep regions of PR models containing mesh skull base tumors were easy to visualize. This 3D printing-based method might be applicable to various surgical simulations.

KEYWORDS:

Mesh structure; Rapid prototyping model; Skull base tumor; Surgical simulation; Three-dimensional printer

PMID:
27052513
DOI:
10.1007/s00701-016-2781-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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