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J Dermatolog Treat. 2016 Oct;27(5):450-5. doi: 10.3109/09546634.2016.1160024. Epub 2016 Apr 7.

Quality of life in treatment of AK: Treatment burden of ingenol mebutate gel is small and short lasting.

Author information

1
a Indiana University School of Medicine , Indianapolis , IN , USA ;
2
b LEO Pharma A/S , Ballerup , Denmark ;
3
c Division of Dermatology , Southern Illinois University School of Medicine , Springfield , IN , USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatments for actinic keratosis (AK) can elicit adverse local skin responses (LSRs). Knowledge regarding the burden of AK treatment on health related quality of life (HRQoL) is however limited.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether treatment of AK improved HRQoL; to assess whether LSRs had an impact on HRQoL during treatment and to analyze the relationship between LSRs and HRQoL.

METHODS:

Patients (n = 329) were randomized for treatment with cryosurgery (CRY) followed by ingenol mebutate (IngMeb) (CRY + IngMeb) or CRY followed by vehicle (CRY + vehicle). HRQoL was analyzed using DLQI, EQ-5D and EQ-VAS at baseline, three days, two weeks and eight weeks post treatment.

RESULTS:

Statistically significant HRQoL improvements were seen in all measures in both treatment groups (p < 0.001). Impairments in DLQI in CRY + IngMeb at LSR peak were within a range interpreted as having "a small impact on patients' life" (2-5), which normalized within two weeks.

LIMITATIONS:

DLQI may not be sensitive to change in the AK disease as it mainly captures symptoms and has a limited focus on feelings.

CONCLUSION:

The treatment burden of IngMeb is small, manageable and short-lasting. Since AK is a chronic condition, often requiring repeated treatment courses, combining treatments that provide enhanced effectiveness, while limiting HRQoL impairment is essential.

KEYWORDS:

Actinic keratosis; DLQI; EQ-5D; health related ouality of life; ingenol mebutate gel; local skin responses

PMID:
27052110
DOI:
10.3109/09546634.2016.1160024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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