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Nat Commun. 2016 Apr 6;7:11284. doi: 10.1038/ncomms11284.

Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages.

Author information

1
Program in Cell Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, 686 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 0A4.
2
Pharmaceutical Institute, Pharmaceutical Chemistry I, University of Bonn, An der Immenburg 4, D-53121 Bonn, Germany.
3
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1G6.
4
Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, 290 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 1N8.

Abstract

Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium dependent, while stimulus-induced macropinocytosis is not. Extracellular calcium is sensed by G-protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) that signal macropinocytosis through Gα-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phospholipase C. These pathways promote the recruitment of exchange factors that stimulate Rac and/or Cdc42, driving actin-dependent formation of ruffles and macropinosomes. In addition, the heterologous expression of CaSR in HEK293 cells confers on them the ability to perform constitutive macropinocytosis. Finally, we show that CaSR-induced constitutive macropinocytosis facilitates the sentinel function of macrophages, promoting the efficient delivery of ligands to cytosolic pattern-recognition receptors.

PMID:
27050483
PMCID:
PMC4823870
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms11284
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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