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PLoS One. 2016 Apr 6;11(4):e0152731. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0152731. eCollection 2016.

The Functional Human C-Terminome.

Author information

1
Nevada Institute of Personalized Medicine, and School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America.
2
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2155, United States of America.
3
Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States of America.

Abstract

All translated proteins end with a carboxylic acid commonly called the C-terminus. Many short functional sequences (minimotifs) are located on or immediately proximal to the C-terminus. However, information about the function of protein C-termini has not been consolidated into a single source. Here, we built a new "C-terminome" database and web system focused on human proteins. Approximately 3,600 C-termini in the human proteome have a minimotif with an established molecular function. To help evaluate the function of the remaining C-termini in the human proteome, we inferred minimotifs identified by experimentation in rodent cells, predicted minimotifs based upon consensus sequence matches, and predicted novel highly repetitive sequences in C-termini. Predictions can be ranked by enrichment scores or Gene Evolutionary Rate Profiling (GERP) scores, a measurement of evolutionary constraint. By searching for new anchored sequences on the last 10 amino acids of proteins in the human proteome with lengths between 3-10 residues and up to 5 degenerate positions in the consensus sequences, we have identified new consensus sequences that predict instances in the majority of human genes. All of this information is consolidated into a database that can be accessed through a C-terminome web system with search and browse functions for minimotifs and human proteins. A known consensus sequence-based predicted function is assigned to nearly half the proteins in the human proteome. Weblink: http://cterminome.bio-toolkit.com.

PMID:
27050421
PMCID:
PMC4822787
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0152731
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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