Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neuroimmunol. 2016 Apr 15;293:91-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2016.02.014. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

Combined exercise training reduces fatigue and modulates the cytokine profile of T-cells from multiple sclerosis patients in response to neuromediators.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
3
Department of Pneumology, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
4
Department of Neurology, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Electronic address: cbento@unirio.br.

Abstract

Fatigue is a common and disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), a classical Th1- and Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. There is no effective pharmacological treatment for fatigue, but some reports point towards beneficial effects of physical activity on management of the fatigue in MS patients. As both MS and fatigue have been associated with dysregulated cytokine network production, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a physical activity program consisting of a 12-week series of combining Pilates and aerobic exercises on fatigue severity, determined by FSS, and cytokine production, quantified by ELISA, by T cells from MS patients (n=08) with low disability (EDSS≤2). The results showed decrease in FSSs in all patients at the end of physical activity intervention. Regarding the cytokines, a significant reduction of IL-22 release was observed in polyclonally-activated T cells form MS patients post-training follow-up. Interestingly, while the physical activity attenuated the ability of dopamine in up-regulating Th17-related cytokines, it enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of serotonin, evidenced by high IL-10 production. In summary, all results suggest that programmed physical activity has beneficial effects on management of fatigue in MS patients, and it could be related, at least in part, to its ability in regulating neuroimmune parameters into T cell compartment.

KEYWORDS:

Cytokines; Dopamine; Fatigue; Multiple sclerosis; Physical activity; Serotonin

PMID:
27049568
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneuroim.2016.02.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center