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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2016 Sep;155(3):423-30. doi: 10.1177/0194599816642418. Epub 2016 Apr 5.

Randomized Trial of Vitamin C/E Complex for Prevention of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Comprehensive Cancer Center, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Comprehensive Cancer Center, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Comprehensive Cancer Center, Seoul, Korea.
5
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Comprehensive Cancer Center, Seoul, Korea yison@skku.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present study was conducted to determine the preventive efficacy of vitamin C/E complex supplementation for radiotherapy (RT)-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

SETTING:

A single tertiary referral institution.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

The trial group (n = 25) received antioxidant supplements (100 IU of vitamin E + 500 mg of vitamin C) twice per day during RT, while the control group (n = 20) received an identical placebo. Pre-RT and 1 and 6 months post-RT, patient-reported xerostomia questionnaires, observer-rated xerostomia score, and salivary scintigraphy were serially obtained to compare xerostomia severity between the 2 groups.

RESULTS:

The trial group showed greater improvements in xerostomia questionnaire and score at 6 months post-RT when compared with those at 1 month post-RT (P = .007 and .008, respectively). In contrast, the control group showed no changes between 1 and 6 months post-RT. By salivary scintigraphy, there was no difference in maximal accumulation or ejection fraction between the 2 groups. However, the trial group maintained significantly better oral indices at the prestimulatory (P = .01) and poststimulatory (P = .009) stages at 1 month post-RT, compared with the control group. At the final follow-up, there was no difference in overall survival and disease-free survival between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest that short-term supplementation with an antioxidant vitamin E/C complex exerts a protective effect against RT-induced xerostomia.

KEYWORDS:

head-and-neck cancer; radiotherapy; randomized trial; vitamin; xerostomia

PMID:
27048670
DOI:
10.1177/0194599816642418
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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