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Acad Pediatr. 2016 Apr;16(3 Suppl):S30-6. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.01.010.

Poverty, Stress, and Brain Development: New Directions for Prevention and Intervention.

Author information

1
Department of Applied Psychology, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, New York University, New York, NY. Electronic address: clancy.blair@nyu.edu.
2
Department of Applied Psychology, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, New York University, New York, NY.

Abstract

We review some of the growing evidence of the costs of poverty to children's neuroendocrine function, early brain development, and cognitive ability. We underscore the importance of addressing the negative consequences of poverty-related adversity early in children's lives, given evidence supporting the plasticity of executive functions and associated physiologic processes in response to early intervention and the importance of higher order cognitive functions for success in school and in life. Finally, we highlight some new directions for prevention and intervention that are rapidly emerging at the intersection of developmental science, pediatrics, child psychology and psychiatry, and public policy.

KEYWORDS:

brain development; early childhood; executive function; infancy; parenting; poverty; stress

PMID:
27044699
PMCID:
PMC5765853
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2016.01.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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