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Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2016 Sep;29(3):354-63. doi: 10.1177/0394632016643550. Epub 2016 Apr 4.

Obesity and kidney disease: Beyond the hyperfiltration.

Author information

1
Division of Hypertension and Nephrology, Department of System Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
2
Department of Health Sciences, University of Catanzaro "Magna Graecia", Catanzaro, Italy steven.nistico@gmail.com.
3
MedStar Cardiovascular Research Network, Washington, DC, USA.
4
Endocrinology Unit, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
5
Internal Medicine, Catholic University, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

In industrialized countries, overweight and obesity account for approximately 13.8% and 24.9% of the kidney disease observed in men and women, respectively. Moreover, obesity-associated glomerulopathy is now considered as "an emerging epidemic." Kidney function can be negatively impacted by obesity through several mechanisms, either direct or indirect. While it is well established that obesity represents the leading risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, awareness that obesity is associated with direct kidney damage independently of hypertension and diabetes is still not widespread. In this paper we will discuss the emerging role of adipose tissue, particularly in the visceral depot, in obesity-induced chronic kidney damage.

KEYWORDS:

hyperfiltration; kidney disease; obesity

PMID:
27044633
PMCID:
PMC5806769
DOI:
10.1177/0394632016643550
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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