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Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2017 Apr;48(2):327-334. doi: 10.1007/s10578-016-0644-5.

The Influence of Environmental Consequences and Internalizing Symptoms on Children's Tic Severity.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, 125 Baldwin Street, Athens, GA, 30602, USA. cydeaton@uga.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, 125 Baldwin Street, Athens, GA, 30602, USA.
3
Tourette Information Center and Support (TICS) of Georgia/Camp Twitch & Shout, Dunwoody, GA, USA.

Abstract

Although there is evidence that environmental consequences for displaying tics and internalizing symptoms are related to tic severity in children with TS, less is known about the inter-relationships of these variables or how these factors jointly contribute to tic severity. This study included 45 children with Tourette syndrome. Caregivers reported on children's environmental consequences for displaying tics, internalizing symptoms, and tic severity. Results indicated that children with higher levels of internalizing symptoms experienced significantly more environmental consequences for displaying tics. Children with higher levels of separation anxiety symptoms demonstrated significantly greater tic severity. Environmental consequences for displaying tics accounted for significantly more variance in predicting tic severity than anxiety symptoms. This preliminary evidence suggests that environmental consequences for displaying tics, such as receiving accommodations or attention from others, have a greater influence on children's tic severity than emotional factors.

KEYWORDS:

Environmental consequences; Internalizing symptoms; Tic severity; Tourette syndrome

PMID:
27044052
DOI:
10.1007/s10578-016-0644-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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