Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vet Surg. 2016 May;45(4):507-14. doi: 10.1111/vsu.12472. Epub 2016 Apr 4.

Owner Evaluation of a CORA-Based Leveling Osteotomy for Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Injury in Dogs.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.
2
Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate a center of rotation of angulation (CORA)-based leveling osteotomy for cranial cruciate ligament injury in dogs.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS:

Dogs (n=70).

METHODS:

Medical records (March 2011 to March 2012) of dogs diagnosed with a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injury treated with a CORA-based leveling osteotomy and stabilized using a bone plate and headless compression screw were reviewed. Radiographs were reviewed for tibial plateau angle and radiographic healing at final evaluation graded on a 5-point scale. Follow-up for a minimum of 6 months postoperatively was conducted by owner completion of a questionnaire regarding their dog's function after surgery. Based on owner responses, clinical outcomes were established.

RESULTS:

CORA-based leveling osteotomy was used for 70 stifles with CCL injury. The mean time to final radiographic recheck was 107 days (range, 32-424 days). Radiographic healing scores were 42 dogs (69%) with grade 4, 17 dogs (28%) with grade 3, and 2 dogs (3%) with grade 2. The mean time to follow-up was 11.9 months (range 6-18 months). Fifty-four of the 70 (77%) dogs had full function, 13 (19%) had acceptable function, and 3 (4%) had unacceptable function. Complications occurred in 11 stifles (16%), including 3 incisional, 6 late-onset meniscal tears, and 2 implant related.

CONCLUSION:

The described method of a CORA-based leveling osteotomy can be successfully performed for treatment of CCL injury in dogs. At the time of mid-term and long-term owner follow-up, most dogs in this case series had returned to full function.

PMID:
27041682
DOI:
10.1111/vsu.12472
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center