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J Clin Anesth. 2016 May;30:15-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2015.11.011. Epub 2016 Feb 20.

A randomized trial examining preoperative sedative medication and postoperative sleep in children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Psychology, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, CA, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California Irvine, USA; Department of Pediatrics, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, CA, USA.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California Irvine, USA.
4
Department of Pediatric Psychology, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, CA, USA; Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California Irvine, USA. Electronic address: mfortier@uci.edu.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

Midazolam has been found to have beneficial effects on anxiety in children in the preoperative setting. Prior studies have examined various postoperative behaviors of children, but little research has examined the effects of preoperative use of midazolam with postoperative sleep. The purpose of this investigation was to compare postoperative sleep in children as a function of preoperative sedative medication use.

DESIGN:

This study was a 2-group randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Participants were recruited from Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital.

PATIENTS:

Participants included a convenience sample of 70 children between the ages of 3 to 12 years undergoing ambulatory tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy.

INTERVENTIONS:

Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: a control group who received preoperative acetaminophen only (n = 32) and an experimental group who received both acetaminophen and midazolam preoperatively (n = 38).

MEASUREMENTS:

Parents completed measures of postoperative behavioral recovery and a subset of children wore actigraphs to examine objective sleep data.

MAIN RESULTS:

Children who received midazolam experienced similar sleep changes compared to children in the control group. The actigraph data revealed that children who received midazolam were awake significantly less during the night compared to the control group (P= .01).

CONCLUSION:

Children who received midazolam before surgery had similar postoperative sleep changes compared to children who did not receive midazolam. Further understanding of the postoperative behavioral effects of midazolam on children will help guide healthcare providers in their practice.

KEYWORDS:

Actigraphy; Midazolam; Pediatrics; Post-operative period

PMID:
27041257
PMCID:
PMC4824545
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinane.2015.11.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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