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Int J Pharm. 2016 May 30;505(1-2):69-78. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.03.066. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Application of a catenary PBPK model to predict the disposition of "catch and release" anti-PCSK9 antibodies.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214, United States.
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214, United States. Electronic address: jb@buffalo.edu.

Abstract

The development of 'catch and release', or pH-sensitive, monoclonal antibodies (mAb) has become of interest to groups seeking to reduce the influence of target-mediated elimination on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In this work, a catenary physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model is described to predict the pharmacokinetic benefit conferred by engineering mAbs for 'catch and release' binding. Our previously published PBPK model was adapted for consideration of the production and elimination of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in mice, and the model was then applied to predict the pharmacokinetics of anti-PCSK9 mAb with pH-stable (J10) and pH-sensitive binding (J17). The model was able to generate reasonable predictions of both J10 and J17 plasma pharmacokinetics. For J10, mean (±standard deviation) predicted vs. observed areas under the plasma concentration curve (AUCinf) were: 217 (77.1) vs. 103nMday (1mg/kg), 1.14×10(3) (858) vs. 769nMday (3mg/kg), and 6.60×10(3) (5.58×10(3)) vs. 2.86×10(3)nMday (10mg/kg), and for J17 the values were: 838 (161) vs. 818nMday (1mg/kg), 2.30×10(3) (441) vs. 2.57×10(3)nMday (3mg/kg), and 8.42×10(3) (1.50×10(3)) vs. 9.17×10(3)nMday (10mg/kg). Further simulations with the model predicted that target turnover and the magnitude of change in the complex dissociation rate constant between pH 7.4 and pH 6.0 are key determinants of the improvements in pharmacokinetics associated with 'catch and release' mAbs. The model described here may be useful for prediction of the pharmacokinetics of 'catch and release' mAbs directed against other targets.

KEYWORDS:

Antibody engineering; Monoclonal antibodies; Physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK)

PMID:
27041125
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.03.066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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