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Br J Nutr. 2016 Jun;115(11):2057-66. doi: 10.1017/S0007114516001136. Epub 2016 Apr 4.

Changes in water and sugar-containing beverage consumption and body weight outcomes in children.

Author information

1
1Institute of Public Health,Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin,Seestr. 73,13347 Berlin,Germany.
2
2Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences,Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115,USA.
3
3Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,University Hospital Essen,University of Duisburg-Essen,Virchowstr. 174, 45147 Essen,Germany.
4
5Research Institute of Child Nutrition,University of Bonn,Heinstück 11,44225 Dortmund,Germany.
5
6Center of Excellence for Nutrition,Hofer Str. 20,95326 Kulmbach,Germany.

Abstract

An intervention study showed that promoting water consumption in schoolchildren prevented overweight, but a mechanism linking water consumption to overweight was not substantiated. We investigated whether increased water consumption replaced sugar-containing beverages and whether changes in water or sugar-containing beverages influenced body weight outcomes. In a secondary analysis of the intervention study in Germany, we analysed combined longitudinal data from the intervention and control groups. Body weight and height were measured and beverage consumption was self-reported by a 24-h recall questionnaire at the beginning and end of the school year 2006/2007. The effect of a change in water consumption on change in sugar-containing beverage (soft drinks and juices) consumption, change in BMI (kg/m2) and prevalence of overweight and obesity at follow-up was analysed using regression analyses. Of 3220 enroled children, 1987 children (mean age 8·3 (sd 0·7) years) from thirty-two schools were analysed. Increased water consumption by 1 glass/d was associated with a reduced consumption of sugar-containing beverages by 0·12 glasses/d (95 % CI -0·16, -0·08) but was not associated with changes in BMI (P=0·63). Increased consumption of sugar-containing beverages by 1 glass/d was associated with an increased BMI by 0·02 (95 % CI 0·00, 0·03) kg/m2 and increased prevalence of obesity (OR 1·22; 95 % CI 1·04, 1·44) but not with overweight (P=0·83). In conclusion, an increase in water consumption can replace sugar-containing beverages. As sugar-containing beverages were associated with weight gain, this replacement might explain the prevention of obesity through the promotion of water consumption.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Children; Juices; Overweight and Obesity; Soft drinks; Water consumption

PMID:
27040694
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114516001136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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