Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Infect Control. 2016 Jul 1;44(7):777-81. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.02.006. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

An average hand hygiene day for nurses and physicians: The burden is not equal.

Author information

1
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2
Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: m.mclaws@unsw.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To understand whether the burden of hand hygiene contributes to poor compliance we measured the daily number of hand hygiene opportunities (HHOs) by shift for nurses and physicians in 2 wards in a 850-bed university teaching hospital.

METHODS:

On each ward 4 trained auditors collected the number of HHOs and compliance events for 24 hours over 7 days. Twenty-one thousand four hundred fifty HHOs were collected from a medical and a surgical ward. The proportion of alcohol-based handrub used daily, the burden of hand hygiene, and compliance rates were calculated separately for nurses and physicians.

RESULTS:

The average indication for alcohol-based handrub cleansing represented 68% of all HHOs. Nurses had an average burden of 55 HHOs per 24 hours or 27 HHOs per shift, 3 times higher than the burden for physicians, who had 16 HHOs per 24 hours or 8 HHOs per shift. Overt observations of the weekly compliance identified nurses had 1.5 times higher compliance than physicians: 76% and 52% (P < .01), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nurses have 3 times more HHOs than physicians, yet nurses have 1.5 times higher compliance than physicians. Hand hygiene compliance in physicians cannot be explained by burden of HHOs.

KEYWORDS:

24/7; Hand hygiene burden opportunities; Overt observation audit

PMID:
27040570
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2016.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center