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Cell. 2016 Apr 21;165(3):715-29. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.061. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

A Taste Circuit that Regulates Ingestion by Integrating Food and Hunger Signals.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
2
Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
3
Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QD, UK; Ticomo Research GmbH, 6300 Zug, Switzerland.
4
Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA; Kavli Neural Systems Institute, New York, NY 10065, USA.
5
Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA; Kavli Neural Systems Institute, New York, NY 10065, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: leslie.vosshall@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

Ingestion is a highly regulated behavior that integrates taste and hunger cues to balance food intake with metabolic needs. To study the dynamics of ingestion in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, we developed Expresso, an automated feeding assay that measures individual meal-bouts with high temporal resolution at nanoliter scale. Flies showed discrete, temporally precise ingestion that was regulated by hunger state and sucrose concentration. We identify 12 cholinergic local interneurons (IN1, for "ingestion neurons") necessary for this behavior. Sucrose ingestion caused a rapid and persistent increase in IN1 interneuron activity in fasted flies that decreased proportionally in response to subsequent feeding bouts. Sucrose responses of IN1 interneurons in fed flies were significantly smaller and lacked persistent activity. We propose that IN1 neurons monitor ingestion by connecting sugar-sensitive taste neurons in the pharynx to neural circuits that control the drive to ingest. Similar mechanisms for monitoring and regulating ingestion may exist in vertebrates.

PMID:
27040496
PMCID:
PMC5544016
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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