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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 May;24(5):1027-34. doi: 10.1002/oby.21434. Epub 2016 Apr 4.

Effects of carnosine supplementation on glucose metabolism: Pilot clinical trial.

Author information

1
Monash Centre for Health, Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Melbourne, Australia.
2
Diabetes and Vascular Medicine Unit, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
3
Institute of Experimental Endocrinology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.
5
Centre for Chronic Disease, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
6
High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
7
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna, Austria.
8
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universitàdegli Studi Di Milano, Milan, Italy.
9
Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
10
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Carnosine is a naturally present dipeptide in humans and an over-the counter food additive. Evidence from animal studies supports the role for carnosine in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, yet there is limited human data. This study investigated whether carnosine supplementation in individuals with overweight or obesity improves diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors.

METHODS:

In a double-blind randomized pilot trial in nondiabetic individuals with overweight and obesity (age 43 ± 8 years; body mass index 31 ± 4 kg/m(2) ), 15 individuals were randomly assigned to 2 g carnosine daily and 15 individuals to placebo for 12 weeks. Insulin sensitivity and secretion, glucose tolerance (oral glucose tolerance test), blood pressure, plasma lipid profile, skeletal muscle ((1) H-MRS), and urinary carnosine levels were measured.

RESULTS:

Carnosine concentrations increased in urine after supplementation (P < 0.05). An increase in fasting insulin and insulin resistance was hampered in individuals receiving carnosine compared to placebo, and this remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, and change in body weight (P = 0.02, P = 0.04, respectively). Two-hour glucose and insulin were both lower after carnosine supplementation compared to placebo in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

These pilot intervention data suggest that carnosine supplementation may be an effective strategy for prevention of type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
27040154
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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